Jewish dating traditions

This means that the process of finding a partner is not haphazard or based on purely external aspects.Rather, a close friend or relative of the young man or woman, who knows someone that they feel may be a compatible partner, suggests that they meet.

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The purpose of the meeting is for the prospective bride and groom to determine if they are indeed compatible.

The meetings usually focus on discussion of issues important to marriage as well as casual conversation.

It also creates a lien on all his property to pay her a sum of money and support should he divorce her, or predecease her.

The document is signed by the groom and witnessed by two people, and has the standing of a legally binding agreement, that in many countries is enforceable by secular law.

Under the chuppah, an honored Rabbi or family member then recites a blessing over wine, and a blessing that praises and thanks G-d for giving us laws of sanctity and morality to preserve the sanctity of family life and of the Jewish people. The blessings are recited over wine, since wine is symbolic of life: it begins as grape-juice, goes through fermentation, during which it is sour, but in the end turns into a superior product that brings joy, and has a wonderful taste.

The full cup of wine also symbolizes the overflowing of Divine blessing, as in the verse in Psalms, "My cup runneth over." The groom, now takes a plain gold ring and places it on the finger of the bride, and recites in the presence of two witnesses, "Behold you are sanctified (betrothed) to me with this ring, according to the Law of Moses and Israel." The ring symbolizes the concept of the groom encompassing, protecting and providing for his wife.

The blessings are also recited over a full cup of wine.

The blessings begin with praising G-d for His creation in general and creation of the human being and proceed with praise for the creation of the human as a "two part creature," woman and man.

The ketuvah is now read aloud, usually by another honoree, after which it is given to the bride.

After this, the sheva brachos, or seven blessings, are recited, either by one Rabbi, or at many weddings a different blessing is given to various people the families wish to honor.

While the bride comes to the chuppah with her parents, a cantor sings a selection from the Song of Songs, and the groom prays that his unmarried friends find their true partners in life.

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