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While none of this is shocking, it paints a consistent picture.Meanwhile, in this particular survey one high-profile issue was conspicuous by its absence near the top of the retention pyramid: compensation.Which is why I read with interest the results of a new employee retention report that recently came across my desk.  The study was conducted by TINYpulse, an employee engagement firm, which surveyed 400 full-time U. employees.   Overall I'd consider the findings less "surprising" than "validating" - confirming once again the fundamental importance of the basic employee-manager relationship.  Let's review the high-level results.

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Which is why I read with interest the results of a new employee retention report that recently came across my desk. Overall I'd consider the findings less "surprising" than "validating" - confirming once again the fundamental importance of the basic employee-manager relationship. The high cost of micromanagement - The study found a strong connection between employee job satisfaction and "freedom to make decisions about how to do their jobs." On the flip side of this managerial coin, however, employees "whose hands are regularly tied are 28% more likely to think about greener pastures elsewhere." Simply put, micromanagement matters.

The study was conducted by TINYpulse, an employee engagement firm, which surveyed 400 full-time U. People leave managers, not companies, as the old saying goes, a theme I've written about before.

Total costs are often estimated from a third of annual salary to numerous multiples of salary for executive positions.

  And as anyone who's ever hired employees knows, the process is seldom as simple as you expect it will be.

Employees who felt chronically overworked - tired and burned out - were "31% more likely to think about looking for a new job than their colleagues who feel comfortable with their workload." mployees with opportunities for professional development were, the report noted, "more than 10% more likely to stay with their current employer." This is fully consistent with other data I've seen on employee development, a management function that's frequently neglected but much appreciated when it's not. "Supervisors can make or break employee retention." Indeed they can.

Culture counts - Beyond these more direct managerial factors, the survey indicated that the broader company culture is also a substantive piece in the retention puzzle.

The retention issues boiling to the top were more emotional than economic.

But in this study, in the aggregate, the purse was overshadowed by the personal.

That's not to say compensation never matters, for of course if someone feels severely underpaid it can fast become a dominating problem.

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