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Imus resides in Brenham, Texas, at a ranch he acquired in 2013.

He moved there full-time in 2015, after ending his Fox Business television simulcast in New York and from there started broadcasting his show solely on radio with the cast members broadcasting from the WABC radio studios.

In March 2009, Imus was diagnosed with stage 2 prostate cancer.

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The single reached #123 in the Record World survey. The Saturday night segment rotated popular hosts Imus, Wolfman Jack, and Robert W. Imus was fired from WNBC in August 1977 along with several of the station's other personalities, in an effort to revamp the station's sound and boost ratings.

In 1978 he returned to Cleveland radio as afternoon drive host on WHK, making the front page of the Cleveland Plain Dealer on his first day back in town.

Imus served in the Marine Corps as a bugler from 1957 to 1960 and battled alcoholism during his early career in New York, but in 1987 finally pursued effective treatment. His act was reminiscent of pioneer shock-jock Petey Green's.

In 1988, with his cocaine and alcohol addictions now legendary in show business, Imus reshaped his show from strictly comedy into a forum for political issues, charitable causes, and news-based parodies, largely inspired by Howard Stern's format.

During this first stint at WNBC, Imus recorded three record albums, two for the RCA Victor label (1200 Hamburgers to Go, including some of his more popular humor from KXOA, WGAR and WNBC broadcasts, and One Sacred Chicken to Go with Anthrax, a primarily studio-created album centering on his satirical character, The Right Rev. Billy Sol Hargis) and one for the Bang label (This Honky's Nuts, an album of his stand up comedy act at the Manhattan nightclub "Jimmy's"—whose title was a tongue-in-cheek reply to fellow comedian Richard Pryor's 1974 album, That Nigger's Crazy).

There was also a 1973 RCA Victor single, "Son of Checkers," issued by Imus. In The Evening aired nationally in the fall of 1973, part of NBC Radio's attempt to revive Monitor, its long-running weekend magazine.

His former waterfront mansion in Westport, Connecticut was sold that same year for .4 million.

After hearing a morning disc-jockey, he went to the nearby radio station and persuaded the owner to hire him.

From 1982 to 1985, the station also employed talk-radio host Howard Stern, and WNBC heavily promoted the pair in print and television ads, which often featured the slogan "If We Weren't So Bad, We Wouldn't Be So Good." Although Stern's show aired later in the day, Imus and Stern often made brief appearances on each other's shows, giving the audience an occasional glimpse of an on-and-off-air rivalry that continued for many years.

During this period, Imus was best known for character Billy Sol Hargis, a radio evangelist whose name was a cross between infamous real-life radio and television preacher Billy James Hargis and real-life Texas fertilizer swindler Billie Sol Estes.

Imus was also the utility announcer for Geraldo Rivera's monthly TV series Good Night, America, which aired as a recurring segment of ABC's Wide World of Entertainment program, and he was one of the inaugural video jockeys for the launch of the VH-1 cable network in 1985.

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